Kiki Swinson’s “tension-packed” (Library Journal) and “unrelenting” (Publishers Weekly), bestselling novels deliver startling twists, unforgettable characters—and a stark, unforgettable portrait of life in the South. Now she detonates an explosive tale about a couple who can’t get enough—and a risk that will exact a merciless price . . .

 

Nobody will get hurt

 

Dawn and Reese Spencer just can’t get ahead. Between her desperate desire to start a family and his gambling debts, they barely keep afloat, even with well-paying Norfolk International port jobs. But their calculating co-worker has the perfect plan: help him smuggle containers of precious, illegal—human—cargo past U.S. Customs.

 

 

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As one of nine siblings raised in the Deep South, plus-sized P.I. Savannah Reid has experienced her share of family drama. But shotgun weddings and snooty in-laws don’t worry her nearly as much as a search for a missing mother and child—especially when it leads to murder . . .

 

Savannah and her husband have settled back in San Carmelita, California, and life is slowly returning to normal—if “normal” means babysitting newlyweds Tammy and Waycross’s incredibly fussy infant daughter. But soothing a squalling baby is kid’s stuff compared to the Midnight Magnolia Detective Agency’s latest case. Handsome up-and-coming actor Ethan Malloy has enlisted the help of Savannah and Co. in a desperate attempt to track down his missing wife and toddler, not long before the beloved family nanny gets murdered.

 

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“If you like the funny side of life, this series is a great read.” —RT Book Reviews, 4 Stars

 

Spring lassos small-town Serenity, as Brandy Borne’s crime-bustin’ mama Vivian hatches a harebrained scheme to run for county sheriff—ropin’ in her daughter to join the rodeo as campaign manager. As the two-woman posse tracks down voters at a local assisted-living home, Brandy’s attempts at corralling Mother’s impractical whims make her feel like a tinhorn on a bucking bronco. But sure as shootin’, unhappy trails lie ahead. . . .

 

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The Couple Next Door meets Gone Girl in this addictive thriller. Once I started reading, I couldn't stop.” --Charlie Donlea, USA Today bestselling author

 

In a taut psychological thriller filled with breathtaking twists, Joseph Souza explores the tangle of betrayal and deception between two neighboring couples, and asks how well we can really know others—or ourselves.

 

It all seems so promising at the start . . .

 

When Leah and her husband, Clay, move from Seattle to Maine, she envisions a vibrant new neighborhood packed with families—playmates for her twins, new friends she can confide in and bond with. But while Clay works long hours to establish his brewery, Leah is left alone each day in a nearly deserted housing development where the only other occupants are aloof and standoffish.

 

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Set in a small Midwest town in the late 1960s and helmed by an unforgettable young protagonist—compassionate, uncannily wise Grace—This I Know is a luminous coming-of-age story from an astonishing new voice.

 

Eleven-year-old Grace Carter has a talent for hiding things. She’s had plenty of practice, burying thoughts and feelings that might anger her strict Evangelical pastor father, and concealing the deep intuition she carries inside. The Knowing, as Grace calls it, offers glimpses of people’s pasts and futures. It enables her to see into the depth of her mother’s sadness, and even allows Grace to talk to Isaac, her twin brother who died at birth. To her wise, loving Aunt Pearl, the Knowing is a family gift; to her daddy, it’s close to witchcraft.

 

 

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In Amanda Skenandore’s provocative and profoundly moving debut, set in the tragic intersection between white and Native American culture, a young girl learns about friendship, betrayal, and the sacrifices made in the name of belonging.

 

On a quiet Philadelphia morning in 1906, a newspaper headline catapults Alma Mitchell back to her past. A federal agent is dead, and the murder suspect is Alma’s childhood friend, Harry Muskrat. Harry—or Asku, as Alma knew him—was the most promising student at the “savage-taming” boarding school run by her father, where Alma was the only white pupil. Created in the wake of the Indian Wars, the Stover School was intended to assimilate the children of neighboring reservations. Instead, it robbed them of everything they’d known—language, customs, even their names—and left a heartbreaking legacy in its wake.

 

 

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